UNDER THE CULTURE SPEAKS TO 2BOP.

The world is throwing us more surprises than Jakkels did when he attacked from behind in Wonderboy. Technology has already taken us into the realm of science fiction. The world is changing at such a rapid rate and it’s reassuring to know that there is a brand like 2BOP that connects us to our roots. 2BOP embodies what will become known as future nostalgia. They remind us that life is a game and we can skiet for as long as we want. They have created a concept that defies the laws of advertising. They’ve created a culture that reminds us how JAS is it is to be a South African. They have a created a brotherhood of gamekoppe and corner store colonels that will stand vas till the end of time. If you don’t know who 2BOP is by now – you better raak wys. It’s time to get with the programme.

I always start off by asking: What is your power animal? But in your case – what is your power character? If you could be any 8-bit character what would it be?

 Anthony: Could it be an existing character or must we invent one?

Brad: I’m straight up Mario, dude.Cos he’s tripping balls all day. He’s fucked on mushrooms in this weird world. He just spends his life tripping balls. It seems like a fun existence to lead. But ya, it could get a bit much.

Lekker. And then I was gonna ask you guys…

 Anthony: Hey! I didn’t get my one. OK … C’mon … there’s so many. OK, that dude from Vigilante … don’t know what his name is but he just walks around going KAPOW! KAPOW! He’s got this pair of nunchucks. He is pretty badass. I’ll find out what his name is and I’ll get back to you. [Lagging in the studio]

 Do you think Billy Mitchell was a true gamekop? Would you guys sit down and actually skiet games with Billy Mitchell?

 Anthony: Of course dude.

 Brad: Fuck yeah. He’s a legend.

 In terms of skill?

Anthony: You cannot deny his skill. The guy took the whole gaming perfection thing to a whole other level. Even if he just happens to be the biggest douche in the universe, it doesn’t mean you don’t want to play games with him.

Brad: I like people that are dicks. I think they’re important in society. And the thing is: I’m all about paying your dues. And there’s not one person on earth that can say that dude has not paid his dues. As far as playing Pacman goes, and Donkey Kong. He is a god, so basically, when he’s inside that small world, he should be allowed to be a dick.

 Anthony: We need people like him for sure. Without him the world would be a boring place.

 

OK, now into 2BOP. Part of 2BOP’s success seems to be because people are becoming nostalgic – wanting to remember times when games were about the gameplay and not about the graphics. It helps remind us of the carefree times we spent with our brasse. When life was all about getting the next two bop and skieting a game. Is this true?

 

Brad: I think nostalgia definitely plays its role here. I think that by nature people are perpetually nostalgic. I’m in my early 30’s now and I’m beginning to sound like my Dad. And when I was I kid I was like: ‘You old ass’. And now I find myself doing the same thing.

Anthony: And I’ve said this somewhere before … 2BOP is not just about nostalgia. This friend of mine came up with this term: Future nostalgia – it’s almost like getting déjà vu in the moment and you’re like – ‘WOW! I’m going to remember this moment forever.’ So, we’re trying to create that kind of feeling where even though you’re inspired by some past era – we’d rather reinterpret it in terms of what’s happening now, and what’s going to be happening in the future. In those terms it is a futuristic style.

 I dig that term – future nostalgia!

 Anthony: Don’t use it too much, it’s trademarked! [Laughs all round]

I believe that colored culture is the most authentic culture in Cape Town, and Cape Flats culture needs to be celebrated. I think you guys are doing a pretty good job. What do you skiem?

 Anthony: What is colored culture? From my side – that’s cool and everything. But I’m like … fuck colored culture, you know. What is colored culture? How do you define culture by one group of people? What is it? Is it because we all eat gatsby’s and lower our cars?

It’s a stereotype, ya?

 Anthony: Exactly. It’s too much of a generalization. It’s about celebrating an area. Obviously there is a colored culture … I’m just saying that to be controversial.

Brad: Stereotypes exist because they are true. I don’t give a fuck what anyone on earth says to me, stereotypes exist because they are true, and I believe you should celebrate it. I believe in not being skaam of who the fuck you are. For me, when I think of colored culture – that’s what I think of – an overwhelming feeling of not giving a fuck. But it’s not giving a fuck because you’re so comfortable in your own skin. And I do think it’s totally and completely unique, and people should celebrate it more. But, you know, I don’t think that colored people would ever tell you to celebrate it, just by the nature of being a colored. You know? So it’s kind of a weird thing because I’m saying that it should be celebrated more, but at the same time you’re like: ‘Nah… fuck, you know, just let it be.’ In a perfect world it should be celebrated, but I’m also like – why?

Anthony: That’s kind of what’s cool about it. People don’t want to be defined by it, but they are. [Laughs all around the studio]

Brad: It’s like the dude rolling past in his lowered to the floor Ford Cortina, or not even a Cortina these days – like a Toyota or some shit, and he’s standing out the side…’tjsy, don’t put me in a box!’ It’s just funny dude.

 I get the feeling sometimes that 8-bit characters are begging to be set free from antiquity. They need to be set free into the real world and into pop culture. Is it just me? Or does 2BOP give these characters a new lease on life?

 

Anthony: Stop smoking so much ganja!

[Laughs all round the studio]

Brad: You know what: To a certain extent, what you’re saying is true. Anthony and myself are very aware of what we’re doing. The whole 8-bit thing has been done before, but a lot of people just take the Atari sign and put it on a t-shirt. But we always try and keep shit a lot more cryptic. So a lot of the time, for example – the Billy Mitchell shirt – it’s this perpetual inside joke. And when someone gets it, they get it. Because it’s always in the weirdest places. We have this one shirt – aesthetically it’s got rad colours, a nice sort of visual image … Lot’s of people can dig it for what it is. But there are hidden layers. It’s this weird character, and it comes from playing Wonder Boy to a level of abuse that you will know who this character is. So, in essence, you are kind of setting it free because you’ll meet someone who’s on that same level as you, they’ve played it just as much as you, and they’re like: ‘Holy shit! That’s that dude that comes from behind and kills you!’

Anthony: It’s true. Back in the early 2000’s I was working some stupid office job – I used to print out stickers and shit on the company printer. No wait … I shouldn’t be saying this. [Brad laughs] I used to put up Wonder Boy characters in the most random spots. They’d normally get stolen. So ya, there was this desire to get these characters out in public spaces. But also more of the obscure characters – not Mario, not  Pacman, not the Space Invaders. It’s also about letting people know that there is depth to the stuff.

 Brad: There are also these background characters that are just kind of there. Like those poor fuckers in that round in Street Fighter – they would just cheer, they would cheer constantly… [Brad laughs]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

OK. Role playing games are big today. Kids in Korea actually drop dead from malnourishment due to weeks of playing. Games like World of Warcraft and Diablo have become the new obsession. Kids are actually dying! Do you guys think todays’ gaming culture is completely different to the old culture?

 Anthony: It’s just evolved. I mean – arcade games by their very nature were designed for you to play them for as little time as possible, so you could put more money into the machine. That’s kind of the fundamental difference. But mobile gaming is becoming quite popular nowadays. It’s something that you can play quickly on the go. Through mobile phones and technology evolving, I think there’s a similarity between arcade games and these quick entertainment games.

Brad: Ya, you know that Thai term – same same … but different?

Ya.

Brad: That’s kind of how it is. It’s still, in essence about being obsessed with whatever it is. Whether it’s playing shoot-em-ups or old mame games. For me it’s still the same sort of thing, but then again it is different. Technology has allowed shit to move a lot further forward. But as Ant says … at the end of the day – everything is designed to make you fail, which is what makes it so appealing. Because you wanna fuck the system. You wanna beat it.

 One of the reasons I love 2BOP so much is that it reminds me not to take life so seriously. It reminds me that life is fun. Life is a game. It’s a philosophy that I’m trying to live by. Do you guys agree with that?

 Anthony: Yeah, totally. That’s why we don’t take ourselves too seriously, or our prints … or our website.

Brad: Just have a jol bra.

 Cape Town is renowned as being cliquey. What do you guys skiem?

 Brad: I think people that say that are fucking whiny bitches. Cape Town is the sort of place where people really don’t give a fuck in a good way. I get annoyed by people who are like: ‘Dude, you my friend right? Dude, you my friend right?’ I want to tell you to fuck off then. If it doesn’t work, if things don’t clique then why force it? I can understand if you’re a buiterlander and you come in. But people persist. They’re like: ‘that guy is such a dick because he won’t be my friend.’ I think Cape Town is simple on that level. I think it’s a massive misconception- fabricated by the haters.

 Anthony: You create that shit yourself. If you just talk to people, they’ll talk back to you.

You guys know what’s happening in Woodstock, with all the gentrification. Where shits becoming more expensive and people are getting kicked out. It makes me feel that a part of Cape Town culture is becoming a bit phony. What do you guys think?

 Anthony: Yeah we totally agree that it’s happening.

Brad: One thousand percent dude. If you look at Woodstock – the Woodstock Industrial Centre – there was a place there called The Golden Plate. These places have been legendary spots to buy gatsbys and fast food. My Dad used to go there back in the day. I’m not saying that shit needs to always remain the same. I do believe in progression, and I do understand that it’s the natural cycle. The city needs to expand. But you can be respectful in the way you do it. It all boils down to respect.

Anthony: What do people value? Like The Golden Plate for example. Some people will say it’s just another failed business, or it’s just another café. But people don’t get the heritage. They don’t get the culture. And back to your earlier question – what is colored culture? That’s part of colored culture. Those developers don’t value that. They could have handled that in a different way.

It always seems to boil down to profit. Profit always seems to reign. Ya?

 Brad: Absolutely dude. This is how it’s always happened, throughout the world. There’s an extremely passive aggressive approach to it. They don’t directly say: ‘Look, we’re kicking you out.’ They say: ‘You can totally stay here for the next 6 months,’ and then they come back and things have changed… rents gone up. So it just puts them in a position where they can’t afford it, so they have to give it up. It comes down to black and white – as in the facts, we know they never actually kicked them out; they left because they couldn’t afford it. But we all know it was just a nice way of them telling them to fuck off.

Anthony: It’s crazy man. You know where that new office block is? With the Spar? A friend of mine lives just around the corner, and she said these old people just got kicked out of their houses, and the houses are just standing there, empty. They’re not using them for anything.

2BOP has a unique and beautiful culture. You guys actually stand for something. You have connected with a core group of followers unlike most brands. How do you guys do this?

 [Anthony and Brad laugh]

 Anthony: We don’t. It just happens. I think people can see when you take pride in what you do, and that you’re having fun and considering what you’re doing and not just doing it to make money. They can see the love you put into it.

Brad: You know what I said earlier about Cape Town and the cliquey thing? Well … we’re not trying to be anything but who we are. If I meet some dude and we clique we’re gonna be homies. It’s not like a “will you be my friend kind of thing”. We don’t say: ‘Please will you wear our clothes?’ So, if you like us, you like our clothes, then cool … fuck with us. And if you don’t then that’s also cool. I think it’s because we don’t push too hard in a society that is based on just forcing shit down your throat. Look at kids nowadays – before they start a band and before they’ve played any instruments they’ve got a Facebook page. And they’re marketing themselves and they’re asking people to like them?! That whole concept of asking someone to like you! What a fucking loser, you know! It’s retarded. And as Anthony says – we just are who we are.

What do you think of Cape Town Fashion? Are we finding our own expression? Or are we still following European trends?

 Anthony: I don’t even consider us part of the Cape Town fashion scene. I don’t even know when it’s Cape Town fashion week. But it depends on what you mean by fashion.

Brad: I do understand that there is a specific European kind of fashion sense, but if you look at the history of Cape Town – it is part African and part European … and that’s a fucking fact. Look at shweshwe prints – all that shit came from Holland and then was just adapted in a different way by Africans. It’s all a mix.

Anthony: I guess the whole world is following everybody else.

The whole world is becoming more globalized. I just don’t see any particular influence. It just seems that everything is becoming more enmeshed. Do you agree?

 Brad: It’s rad when things are enmeshed. I don’t believe that being an individual means that you’ve got to hang onto something. I’m not an individual because I’m holding onto my African heritage. Being an individual is being an individual. And celebrating the fact that we are this massive big pit of inbred fucking mongoloids.

 I study culture and one thing that I find fascinating is how subcultures overlap each other, especially in Cape Town. Gaming culture overlaps with skating culture which overlaps with hip hop culture. It doesn’t seem to be one thing.

 Anthony: I think gaming culture is so ubiquitous nowadays. It’s so huge. It’s as big as Hollywood in terms of revenue. You can’t separate the two. And any others for that matter.

And finally: RAAK WYS: What does this actually mean?

 [Laughs all round]

 Brad: If you directly translate it – RAAK WYS would mean get wise or wise up. But I don’t think it actually means that. It’s the same as the word JAS. It depends on a multitude of different things. It’s about how you use it and it’s in the delivery as well.

 Anthony: It’s also like the ‘shits gonna go down now’.

Brad: Exactly. You could walk in somewhere and someone is kissing your chick and you’re like: ‘Naaier! Raak wys!’ Or your football team could have just scored a goal and you say: ‘RAAK WYS!‘

 VISIT THE 2BOP WEBSITE AND FIND THE NEAREST STORE LOCATION.

[You can also order caps, tees, and sweats online.] 

 

 

ELITISM MAKES CAPE TOWN CLIQUE /// ELITISM MAKES CAPE TOWN TICK

Lets take a look at elitism in Cape Town, and more specifically elitism at our tertiary institutions. At first glance, elitism may not seem as gory as racism in terms of segregation, however it is just as firmly entrenched into our psyche as racism is.

I was born into a white working class family. I was privileged in the sense that I was educated at one of Cape Town’s elite schools, but I was conflicted while growing up because I was not from a wealthy family. I went on to do other things after school, and now I am studying at an elite tertiary institution in Cape Town. Coincidental? I think not.

Elitism is universal. It is crucial in keeping the cogs of The Corporation ticking over. It is what keeps the Monarchy alive. It is what keeps the government in power. Elitism runs through our DNA.

Let’s start at the top. We all know that the world is connected via tribes, brotherhoods and bloodlines.

All of us were born into a system of unspoken rules, which told us that we must obey authority at all times and we were punished when we didn’t. We were taught in school to uphold the hierarchy, the status quo, the goddamn social structure. Furthermore, while we were in school we were conditioned to believe that we had to belong to a clique in order to survive.

Then we entered University. We became pseudo-intellectuals. This imagined academic community creates the very substance of exclusivity and superiority. Kirsten J. Broadfoot explains that this as a group that “functions like an exclusive club whose membership is tightly controlled by what might be called a ‘dominant frame.’”

The highly educated people of Cape Town and the Ivory Towers of the world have formed isolated cliques whose views are overrepresented amongst journalists, professors, and other members of the intelligentsia.

  ///     Professors at UCT and Stellenbosch see themselves as part of an elite club but their influence is purely imaginary. So, what happens when you combine the pseudo-intellectual elite with the actual old-money bloodlines of UCT and Stellenbosch University students? You get a goddamn nuclear fusion of congenital sex and intellectual masturbation.    ///

This inbreeding filters into society and the corporations that keep our economy ticking over. These exclusive clubs penetrate Cape Town and the world at large with their demonic, self-righteous codes of conduct. These secret societies keep Cape Town and the world segregated in a web of philosophical superiority.

An obvious benefit of going to university is to form alliances, and we do. We form our own brotherhoods so that when we enter the real world we are not alone. We then enter the world thinking that we’re superior to the rest of society.

When we walk into the energy field of a tightly bound Cape Town clique we will feel those familiar feelings – those jarring, prickly sensations of being judged by more than one person simultaneously.

The Cape Town cliques talk in “code”. It’s like stumbling onto the set of a reality show where everyone is following the script. One thing that can be said is that they’re incredibly in-synch with each other – this is because they have blocked out all external influencers and influences.

The social structure of The Cape Town Clique mirrors that of every other social construct, for example: The Corporation and The Government (which are in fact the same entity).  There is always a leader – a “queen bee” who wields her power with her good looks, manipulation and monetary power. She dictates whom she likes and the rest inevitably follow.

The problem with belonging to a clique is that you become narrow minded, ignorant and fake. If you choose to be exclusive then you may as well film each moment and send the unedited footage to Fox and CBS because your bogus interactions deserve an equally phony audience.

WHAT MAKES CAPE TOWN CLIQUE? WHAT MAKES CAPE TOWN TICK?

(PICTURES EXCLUDED TO AVOID CREATING MORE STEROTYPES)

Capetonians are notoriously cliquey. I was born in Johannesburg where I lived for seven years before moving to Cape Town. When I was 19 I headed for the big bad US of A where I spent a year in Philadelphia, Boston and New York collectively as well as two years in Texas. So, these being my only other points of reference I can safely conclude that yes, Cape Town is cliquey.

While travelling through America I discovered that its people are infinitely more open minded and inclusive when it comes to socializing. We generally stick within our circle of friends and very rarely venture out of our comfort zones.

I interviewed Charles John recently and he offered me an entirely different point of view.

I asked him if he thought Cape Town was cliquey, he replied:

“Yes and no. Yes in the sense that obviously people hang out in cliques, but no in the sense that you can’t really call it cliquey because it’s the nature of human kind to surround ourselves with people similar to us. It’s the process of natural selection. We stay in herds, we need to be around people that in case danger arises that we’re around people that we’re safe with, you know, you don’t want to be around people and 90% of those people run away from their comfort zone, and leave you stranded. So, being in a clique is negative in a social way, but in a human way it’s the most natural thing.”

I agree with what he says, and yes there is this innate human truth that is impossible to ignore, but somehow we take it to another level – especially white people. It’s as if each of our cliques live in separate villages, governed by unconscious social codes.

Cape Town is a lot more segregated than other cities in South Africa. Why is this so? What is it about us that makes us so damn exclusive within our tribes?

 ///          Why do Inner-City Hipsters never hang out with trance koppe? Why do the Rock-Chic avoid Irie-vibing Hippies like syphilis? Why do Constantia Boytjies spend so much time working on their abs? Why do Brasse vannie Flats never hit Long Street, even though they shmaak white chicks? Why do Southerners rarely venture past the Boerewors Gordyn?       ///

“In spite of our social progress over the past 20 years Cape Town remains a culturally divided city. Cultures and even subcultures remain insular and exclusive.”  – Wendy Moorcroft

Social and cultural groups remain separate. This applies to all groups: Cultural, ethnic, racial, religious and class. Now, these structures grip the entire world, not only Cape Town. We’ve been conditioned from birth to believe that we’re separate from each other. We’ve created film, media and music which has shaped stereotypes; religions have created vacuums of separation; money has built class structures; our skin colour creates illusions of separateness. These constructions are universal.

So then, it’s got to have something to do with the way Cape Town is laid out – the very mountain, the goddamn seventh wonder of the world which we all adore could just be the thing that has planted an imaginary barrier within our minds.

Segregation is usually always seen as a hindrance to societal advancement, but there is also a flip side to all of this. Creativity at its very core thrives on polarity; it thrives on the perpetual drive to transcend reality. The very fact that we are so cliquey is also a reason for why we’re known as The Creative Capital of the World. Jeez man, I love this city.

I’ll be running a bulldozer through our collective psyche to uncover, once and for all what makes Cape Town clique, and what makes Cape Town tick.

This is a party and everyone’s invited. Take a stab. Take a stance. Wys me. I invite you on my quest to discover what lives Under the Culture.

THE CHARLES JOHN INTERVIEW.

    When starting a blog about pop culture, it only makes sense to start by interviewing my friends that have a direct influence on my life. Also, it is a good idea to start with artists who are destined for stardom, thus making all of you famous simply by association.

Charles John has his creative fingers directly on the pulse of Cape Town culture. He is a 3rd year Art Direction student at the Red & Yellow School in Cape Town. He lives in Athlone.

I hope you enjoy what he has to say:

Aweh.

  •  Whatsup man.

 Hoe lyk it?

  •  Dit lyk lekker.

Charles John, what is your power animal?

  •  My power animal! Hahaha! That is a very easy question actually. My power animal is very defined. It is definitely a white dragon with golden armour over its head and partly on it’s back legs, but as it needs more armour it makes more armour.

 What’s your favourite petrol station?

  •  Hahahahahaha. This is probably the best question so far.

Well it’s only the second question.

  •  Yes Ok, well my favourite petrol station is ironically the same petrol station that I always punt, which is … Shell. This is because … yoh, it’s weird because it’s the same reason people kind of use microwaves, smoke cigarettes. You know that it’s bad but the convenience of it, or the lack of other options drives you to use something that you know you shouldn’t be taking part in. I’m basically a whore.

 Do you sleep, Charles John?

  •  I sleep all the time. I’m sleeping right now. I’ve perfected the art of sleep talking. And most people think I’m awake when in actual fact I’m sleeping. Ya, I have advanced technology in these glasses – it makes it look like my eyes are moving, when infact they’re not. They are a recording of my eyes open.

 How many hours of sleep do you require, and why?

  •  24 hours of sleep, because I’m a 25 hour man.

 What is your take on faux fur coats?

  •  They are beast man, or non-beast you know, because they’re not from a beast. But I think that they’re cool. I like fake shit in general. Fake shit, fake people. You know, as long as you know you’re fake then I’m cool. As long as you’re not pretending to be something else.

 Would you consider yourself a fine artist? A graphic artist? A futurist?  What the hell are you man, what are you?

  • I’ve been struggling with this question for a long time. Definitely not a fine artist. And personally I just like to refer to myself as a creative. Definitely not a futurist, I don’t think anyone’s a futurist.  People like to create these things, you know, these words, but as soon as that day comes you’ve defeated the purpose in whatever the heck you were talking about to begin with. You’re living in the present so you cannot then qualify yourself as a futurist. But ya, I’m a creative.

 What will the world look like in 10 years time?

  •  Like it does now, but with more people…and stuff. That’s my prediction. I predict that. I stand for it. I guarantee it. The world will still be round.

What do you mean? Not triangular?

  •  A round world. I’m guaranteeing a round world.

What needs to be exposed in Cape Town? Anything that you feel is not getting the attention it deserves?

  •  The hipsters are largely overrated in Cape Town, and it’s come to a point that anything that is outside of what we consider normality is automatically hipster-is. It’s such a mundane blanket word. It’s actually a hateful word. I think that calling someone a hipster when they’re not a hipster is a hate crime, you know, it’s like calling me a hotnot. That’s what it’s like. That’s how I feel. I’m more offended when someone calls me a hipster than when someone calls me a hot not.
  • And yeah, what needs to be exposed: Yoh. There’s so much under this culture, like colored people in general, you know, like the way that we speak. The way we walk, the way we communicate, the way that we talk to each other with our eyes. Black culture; the hood. The way black men from the hood wear their skinny jeans in comparison to the way white men from Constantia wear their skinny jeans: it’s completely different. I’m talking about don’t touch my ankles swag, you know. And I’m talking about the kind of swag when you’re owning it. It’s not like: Haha his pants are too short, it’s like: That shit is dope.

 What do you think about advertising and the future of advertising?

  •  Advertising? This is the hardest question. Advertising? I think … I’m actually writing a blog about it right now. I see it going completely online. And advertising right now I’d say…is in its prime. Probably everyone that was in their time likes to think that whatever’s going on is in its prime.
  • I’m very afraid that advertising might implode in on itself, you know, because digital in itself is so simple, so easy for everyone to do. If everyone decides they wanna be a freelance advertiser, you know, we’ll end up with so much spam and that spam will equal advertising in the minds of the audience. Then how do you defer your advertising from spam? Are people just going to neglect advertising on a whole because it’s just this influx of shit? And that’s kind of what I’m seeing: that advertising will collapse in on itself.
  • I’m wondering now, based on your question, how will advertising separate itself from the virtual spam of the future?

And what is your take on the Cape Town street art scene?

  •  What street art scene? Are you talking about the government painting all the white shit over the graffiti? Yoh! That is the Cape Town street art scene! The Cape Town street art scene is government blocks of white paint, which I don’t respect. In that respect, I have no respect for Cape Town street art because it’s all white blocks from the government. Because they decided that they wanted to get rid of gang graffiti, but in their bylaw they qualify anything as gang graffiti that is not the original number of the building or the original colour of the building. So everything that is on a building, on a wall, even if it’s not gang graffiti, they’ll remove. That has become street art today in Cape Town. It’s bullshit.

 What do you think pop culture actually is?

  • Yoh! Pop culture?! Pop culture is literally… I would define it as whatever is tweaking mass medias’ nipples, you know, that’s what pop culture is. That’s what Andy Warhol was. Pop culture is what makes the media, the commercial media be like: What the fuck? Some of the stuff is timeless, but pop culture in of itself is questionable, and impressionable and malleable within itself. It doesn’t take itself so seriously, but it pretends to take itself seriously in its “non-seriousness”. It’s such an abnormality. It’s weird; I think it’s whatever’s tweaking contemporary medias nipples.

 People say Cape Town is cliquey, do you think so?

  •  Clicky, as in isi-Xhosa, you mean?

No cliquey as in you hang out with your clique.

  •  Yes and no. Yes in the sense that obviously people hang out in cliques, but no in the sense that you can’t really call it cliquey because it’s the nature of human kind to surround ourselves with people similar to ourselves. It’s the process of natural selection. We stay in herds, we need to be around people that in case danger arises that we’re around people that we’re safe with, you know, you don’t want to be around people and 90% of those people run away from their comfort zone, and leave you stranded. So, being in a clique is negative in a social way, but in a human way it’s the most natural thing.

 What’s the best spot to chow in Cape Town?

  •  At the moment I’m into Rafiki’s on a Monday evening man, and booze ball. Ya.

 Are you going to the Lady Gaga concert?

  •  Fuck no.
Charles John has his own blog:
You can also follow him on twitter: @thecharlesjohn

 

 

Welcome to Cape Town – (Not for tourists.)

 

Welcome to the culture.

We live in the most beautiful city in the world, a mesmerizing cocoon of wonder. We know this, and we don’t hold back in reminding the rest of the world about this whenever we can.

Join me on my quest to find out what makes Cape Town tick, and what makes Cape Town clique. There is a common perception that Cape Townies are a cliquey, self-satisfied bunch of people. I have lived here for 22 years and yes, there is an element of truth in that, but I hope to convince you that the reasons why may not be as defined as we think.

I’ll take you deeper, beneath the culture, under the radar on a voyage into the lungs of this city, the arteries of the people.

I’m gonna break the pieces apart and put them back together again. It’s a party and you’re all invited. Knock me off my “soap box” if I get a little preachy. Tune me, wys me. I’ll piss a few people off. Brasse might be coming to slit my tyres. I’ll step on a few toes, but that’s OK. I’m tight with the 26.

I’ll challenge your perceptions on blacks, coloureds and whites. I’m a white boy. But deep down I’m a mixed breed, a pavement special.

We don’t live in a bubble; the Internet changed all that. We’re in a global village now. Our culture is influenced by the “outside” world just laaik the rest of them. We’ve borrowed elements of global fashion and pop culture and made them our own, BUT: And this is a big but: We are THE most creative group of people in the world, and WE should be defining our own pop culture. I believe we are, but right now it’s bubbling beneath the surface.

There are enough (fantastic) blogs that focus on “hipster” culture, street fashion, the party scene and art. I’d like to expose the rest of it.

Ultimately I want to create a platform to promote the edgier side of Cape Town, because we’re not all about hipsters and hippies. We’re not a stereotype. There’s an underbelly that deserves attention too. Lets celebrate all of it.